Japanese Fishermen Capture Dolphins in Taiji Cove


A baby albino dolphin rounded up with others in Taiji Cove, Japan, has already been taken from its mother and could sell for up to $200,000. Sea Sheperd

A baby albino dolphin rounded up with others in Taiji Cove, Japan, has already been taken from its mother and could sell for up to $200,000.
Sea Sheperd

Fishermen and divers caught at least 25 dolphins in a controversial Japanese fishing village Saturday, according to environmentalists, who said the process was captive selection ahead of a mass slaughter.

Activists from the environmental group Sea Shepherd streamed live footage of the dolphin capture in the village of Taiji, which drew worldwide attention in 2010 when it became the subject of the Academy Award-winning documentary “The Cove,” a hard-hitting film about the annual dolphin hunt.

Japanese Slaughtering Whales In Ocean Santuary

Every year the fishermen of Taiji corral hundreds of dolphins into a secluded bay, select a few dozen for sale to aquariums and marine parks, and stab the rest to death for meat.

The town’s fishermen defend the hunt as a cultural tradition, and “The Cove” was met by protests from right-wing activists when it was screened in Japan in 2010.

Sea Shepherd said Saturday that at least 25 dolphins of about 250 corralled were taken away from their pods for possible sale to aquariums, including a young albino, and that the selection was likely to continue Sunday.

Dolphins Call Each Other By Name

 “Those taken captive are forced to watch as the remaining members of their family are brutally killed for human consumption,” the environmentalist group said in a statement.

The slaughter had not begun by the time the selection process ended Saturday afternoon, and it was unclear when it would.

The Taiji Fisheries Cooperative Association, which is in charge of the dolphin hunt, was not immediately available for comment.

Credits: Discovery News

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